Nepal Geological Society (NGS)

Nepalese National Group of IAEG Since 20 Years

+977-01-4437874
P.O.Box No. 231 Kathmandu, Nepal
info@ngs.org.np

Category: NEOGENE TO QUATERNARY LACUSTRINE SEDIMENTS IN THE KATHMANDU VALLEY, NEPAL


NEOGENE TO QUATERNARY LACUSTRINE SEDIMENTS IN THE KATHMANDU VALLEY, NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
Neogene to Quaternary lacustrine sediments in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

Mitsuo Yoshida

Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Hokkaido University

Sapporo 060, Japan (Present Address: Department of Geology, Trichandra Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal)

Yaeko Igarashi

Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 73-100

 

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Abstract

Fluvial and lacustrine sediments distributed in the Kathmandu Valley are divided into eight stratigraphic units in ascending order. The Lukundol Formation, Pyanggaon Terrace Deposit, Chapagaon Terrace Deposit, Boregaon Terrace Deposit, Gokarna Formation, Thimi Formation, Patan Formation and Lower Terrace Deposit. The age of theLukundol Formation may be Pliocene to Early Pleistocene; on the other hands, the Gokarna, Thimi and Patan Formations correspond to the Last Glacial Epoch, based on the data from radiometric dating, paleomagnetic measurement and pollen analysis. The southern area of the Kathmandu valley adjoining the Mahabharat Mountains has probably been upheaved in Early to Middle Pleistocene after the deposition of the Lukundol Formation.

SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SIWALIK (CHURIA) GROUP IN CHITWAN DUN, CENTRAL NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
Some characteristics of the Siwalik (Churia) Group in Chitwan Dun, Central Nepal

Takao Tokuoka

Department of Geology, Shimane University, Matsue, Japan

Mitsuo Yoshida

Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 63-72

 

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Abstract

The Siwalik group (Churia group) in and around western part of the Chitwan Dun are divided into the lower, middle and upper formations, roughly correlable to the Lower, Middle and Upper Siwaliks of India and Pakistan, respectively. The lower formation (more than 500 m) consists of alternating beds of fine sandstone and siltstone. The middle formation (200 m thick) is characterized by thick-bedded, medium to coarse sandstones. The upper formation (more than 500 m thick) is composed predominantly of gravel beds. The Siwaliks comprise a coarsening upwards sequence as a whole, reflecting the rising Himalayas during Neogene Period. Many molluscan fossils (Unionidae and fresh-water gastropods) are found in the middle formation. This is the first discovery of well-preserved mollusks from the Siwaliks in Nepal. Mud-cracks and rain-drops are also found in them. These are important for interpretation of the Siwalik sedimentation.

 

Concerning the paleomagnetic polarity stratigrapny it is possible that the normal polarity zone in the upper formation corresponds to an event in the Matsuyama Reversed Epoch or a part of the Gaus Normal Epoch, and that a long normal polarity zone found in the lower formation corresponds to an older Epoch than Epoch 5, although no fossil and geochronologic evidences have been obtained yet.

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE PALEOMAGNETISM OF TANSEN GROUP, WEST CENTRAL NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
Some observations on the paleomagnetism of Tansen Group, west central Nepal

Mitsuo Yoshida

Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Hokkaido University

Sapporo 060, Japan (Present Address: Department of Geology, Trichandra Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal)

Harutaka Sakai

Department of Geology, Kyushu University

Fukuoka 812, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 53-61

 

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Abstract

Preliminary results of paleomagnetic measurement of the Tansen Group ranging from late Paleozoic to early Cenozoic in age in west central Nepal are consistent with already-known paleomagnetic data from Indo-Pakistan and southern side of the Yarlung Zangbo River. The essential paleolatitudes obtained from the paleomagnetic data increase gradually towards the upper horizon in the Tansen Group.

STRATIGRAPHY OF TANSEN AREA IN THE NEPAL LESSER HIMALAYAS

September 26th, 2018 by
Stratigraphy of Tansen area in the Nepal Lesser Himalayas

Harutaka Sakai

Department of Geology, Kyushu University

Fukuoka, 812 Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 41-52

 

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Abstract

In the Tansen area of Lesser Himalayas in western Nepal we can distinguish a sedimentary terrace which corresponds to the Krol Belt of the Kumaon Lesser Himalayas. The terrace lies north of the Main Boundary Thrust, and includes the Lower Gondwana glacial beds (the Sisne Formation), the Upper Gondwana beds (the Taltung), the probably Cretaceous beds containing marine facies (the Amile), the middle Eocene beds (the Bhainskati), and the possible Oligocene to early Miocene beds (the Dumri) consisting of thick, nonmarine sandstones. The first can be correlated with the Blaini of the Simla-Kumaon Krol Belt, the second and the third with the Tal, the fourth with the Subathu and the last with the Dagshai. However, no rock units that are lithologically and stratigraphically comparable with the Infra Krol and the Krol are present in the Tansen area. On the other hand, the Taltung Formation is unique in containing the Upper Gondwana Flora and basaltic lava flows, both of which have not been recognized elsewhere in the Lesser Himalayan Range.

 

The rock units that were formerly assigned to the Blaini, the Infra Krol and the Krol in the Tansen area are comparable with the sequence ranging from the Deoban (Ganglihat) Limestone, through the Sor Slates, to the Talkedar Limestone of the Tejam Group in the Krol Belt of Kumaon.

OBSERVATION ON THE GEOLOGY OF THE KARNALI REGION, WEST NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
Observation on the geology of the Karnali region, west Nepal

Daigoro Hayashi, Yasushi Fujii, Toshifumi Yoneshiro and Koshiro Kizaki

Department of Marine Sciences, University of the Ryukyus

Okinawa, 903-01, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 29-40

 

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Abstract

The Karnali region is occupied by thick piles of the sediments belonging to the Midland supergroup and the overlying Himalayan gneiss group. The Himalayan gneiss group is correlative to the Vaikrita of Valdiya (1980), and the Midland supergroup may be correlated with the Tejam group and the Jaunsar nappe including a part of the Chail nappe. Unline some earlier observations, the Midland supergroup is believed to be an autochthonous basement overlain by the allochthonous Himalayan gneises, and that the inverted metamorphism is attributed to the heat from the MCT (Arita, 1983; Maruo and Kizaki, 1983) rather than as a result of multiple nappe structure.

GEOLOGY AND STRUCTURE OF THE JAJARKOT-PIUTHAN AREA, CENTRAL NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
Geology and structure of the Jajarkot-Piuthan area, Central Nepal

Kazunori Arita

Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060, Japan

Toran Sharma

Department of Mines and Geology, Kathmandu, Nepal

Yasushi Fuji

Department of Marine Sciences, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-01, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 5-27

 

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Abstract

The Lower Himalayas of central Nepal between Piuthan and Jajarkot are geologically divided into the northern and southern belts by the Jajarkot Crystalline klippe. The northern belt consists mainly of the Older Midland Complex that can be safely correlated with the Lower Nawakot Group of central Nepal. The Older Midland Complex is Riphean to Eocambrian in age and of parautochthonous to allochthonous nature. On the other hand the southern belt is mainly composed of the Younger Midland Complex which is probably correlative with the Upper Nawakot Group and of autochthonous to parautochthonous nature. The younger Midlands seem to conformably overlie the Older Midlands. The mineral lineation striking north-northeast to northeast is conspicuous in the Older Midlands, whereas no mineral lineation is observed in the Younger Midlands. In the present area at least two major klippes are recognized. The Jajarkot Crystalline klippe is transported from the Main Central Thrust zone lying to the north, covering the Older Midlands. The Sallyan klippe, composed of the Older Midlands and resting on the Younger Midlands in the southern belt, has its root in the northern belt. The Sallyan klippe is likely overlain by the Jajarkot Crystalline klippe.

OUTLINE OF THE STUDY ON THE CRUSTAL MOVEMENTS IN THE NEPAL HIMALAYAS II

September 26th, 2018 by
Outline of the study on the crustal movements in the Nepal Himalayas II

Koshiro Kizaki

Department of Marine Sciences, University of Ryukyus

Okinawa, 903-01, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 4, Special Issue, 1984, 1-3

 

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Abstract

The field investigations on the “Study on the crustal movements in the Nepal Himalayas” (CHM) were carried out under the leadership of K. Kizaki in 1982-83 as the continuance of the CMH 1980 with the permission and cooperation of His Majesty’s Government of Nepal. The reports of the CMH 1980 was published as a special issue of the Journal of Nepal Geological Society in 1982. The present special issue of the Journal of Nepal Geological Society also contains the results of the field surveys and laboratory works in the Nepal Himalayas on the geology and geomorphology as well as the geomagnetism and pollen analysis conducted by the members of the CMH 1982.

GEOLOGY OF THE KATHMANDU FLUVIATILE LACUSTRINE SEDIMENTS IN THE LIGHT OF NEW VERTEBRATE FOSSIL OCCURRENCES

September 26th, 2018 by
Geology of the Kathmandu fluviatile lacustrine sediments in the light of new vertebrate fossil occurrences

Gopal M. S. Dangol

Department of Mines and Geology, Lainchaur, Kathmandu, Nepal

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 3, Number 1 & 2, 1985, 43-57

 

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Abstract

The fluviatile lacustrine sediments of the Kathmandu Valley have been restudied. New fossil discoveries in the southern part of the valley sheds light on the geology of the Kathmandu Valley.

 

The finds comprise, diverse vertebrate fossils represented by elephant, deer, bovine and pig belonging to Plio-Pleistocene age. The paper mainly deals with stratigraphy of the Lukundol Formation and evolution of the Kathmandu sediments.

RIVER TERRACES AND CRUSTAL MOVEMENT IN THE AREA AROUND NARAYANGHAT, CENTRAL NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
River terraces and crustal movement in the area around Narayanghat, central Nepal

Shuji Iwata

Department of Geography, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Setagaya, Tokyo 158, Japan.

Takashi Nakata

Department of Geography, the University of Hiroshima Hiroshima 730, Japan

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 3, Number 1 & 2, 1985, 33-42

 

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Abstract

The river terraces and hill landforms have been surveyed in the, Siwalik mountains around Narayanghat in order to understand the nature of regional crustal movement. The river terraces are classified into six groups by airphoto interpretation and a field survey including soil colour comparison. Deformation of terrace surfaces were found, and a past course of the Kali Gandaki has been identified to exist at an altitude of 170m high above the present river bed. Accordingly, the Siwalik mountains in the area have upheaved since pre-Last Inter-glacial time.

GEOLOGY AND FOUNDATION TREATMENT OF KULEKHANI DAM, CENTRAL NEPAL

September 26th, 2018 by
Geology and foundation treatment of Kulekhani dam, central Nepal

Devi Bahadur Thapa

Electricity Department, Kathmandu, Nepal

Jour. Nep. Geol. Soc., Vol. 3, Number 1 & 2, 1985, 21-32

 

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Abstract

The Kulekhani Hydroelectric Project is located in Bhimphedi group of Kathmandu complex. Kalitar formation, Chisapani quartzites and Kulekhani formations are the main rock types with Palung granite massif intruded in the middle part of the area. Alluvial deposits are widely developed in the Southern part.

The dam foundation consists of quartzites and schists of Kulekhani formation. The foundation rocks are weaker on both the banks. Core trench was excavated up to the level of sound rocks and foundation treatment done up to 100m depth rendering the foundation watertight.

Nepal Geological Society P.O.Box No. 231 Kathmandu, Nepal
Freephone: +977-01-4437874

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